Lin-zLoo

A film is - or should be - more like music than like fiction. It should be a progression of moods and feelings. The theme, what's behind the emotion, the meaning, all that comes later. ~Stanley Kubrick

89,309 notes

facts-i-just-made-up:


J.K. Rowling wrote the first chapter of what would become Harry Potter on the wall of her room in a cupboard under the stairs while she was locked away there by her foster parents.
Unable to return to the house as an adult while developing the novel series, several elements she wrote originally as a child were forgotten, including a mouse friend that Harry named Thistle, the description of numerous bruises on Harry’s head from the stairs above, and a subplot in which Hagrid kept building mechanical trinkets that would have revolutionized the muggle world but were always thrown away as they were uninteresting to wizards.
This photo was taken in 2009 just before the house was torn down, and is all that remains of what is technically the first manuscript of the series. Efforts were to have been undertaken to preserve the historically important wall, but in the end Rowling was unwilling to spend the near $200 it would have taken to do so, stating that “money didn’t grow on trees”.

facts-i-just-made-up:

J.K. Rowling wrote the first chapter of what would become Harry Potter on the wall of her room in a cupboard under the stairs while she was locked away there by her foster parents.

Unable to return to the house as an adult while developing the novel series, several elements she wrote originally as a child were forgotten, including a mouse friend that Harry named Thistle, the description of numerous bruises on Harry’s head from the stairs above, and a subplot in which Hagrid kept building mechanical trinkets that would have revolutionized the muggle world but were always thrown away as they were uninteresting to wizards.

This photo was taken in 2009 just before the house was torn down, and is all that remains of what is technically the first manuscript of the series. Efforts were to have been undertaken to preserve the historically important wall, but in the end Rowling was unwilling to spend the near $200 it would have taken to do so, stating that “money didn’t grow on trees”.

(Source: likeafieldmouse, via alwaysguessing-neverknowing)

6 notes

Underrated Movies: Dear Frankie

One of the first, if not the first movie I ever saw Emily Mortimer or Gerard Butler in and was incredibly moved by both of their performances. Set in Glasgow, Scotland, Lizzie and her son, Frankie reside in a small apartment with her mother. Lizzie has always made it seem that her son, Frankie’s father has been working out at sea his whole life, only being able to communicate through post. However, soon viewers find out it the letters are actually being written by Lizzie herself. She quickly, but nervously decides to hire a man to pose as his father when the ship she pretended Frankie’s real father is on comes into port. In the span of two days, this mysterious man changes there lives forever just by merely being there for the both of them.

If you’re longing to see Gerard Butler in a serious, dramatic role then this is the ticket. He will capivate you along with Emily Mortimer as they play two seemingly tortured people willing to open up and comfort one another in a time when they need it most. Not to mention Jack McElhone as Frankie will warm your heart as his portrayal as not only a boy longing for the presence of a father but also as a boy who became deaf when he was only a baby. The moment when Gerard Butler’s character (and no, you never find out his name) finds out how Frankie became deaf will rattle you and make you see just how much talent he has as well as give such weight to such a dramatic moment in a somewhat beautifully, simplistic movie. If you appreciate a good story and superb acting, then I recommend this movie for you!

Filed under Dear Frankie Gerard Bulter Emily Mortimer Jack McElhone amazing movies Glasgow glasgow scotland underrated movies movies

2,648 notes

"How long had Mr. Knightley been so dear to her, as every feeling declared him now to be? When had his influence, such influence begun?— When had he succeeded to that place in her affection, which Frank Churchill had once, for a short period, occupied?—She looked back; she compared the two—compared them, as they had always stood in her estimation, from the time of the latter’s becoming known to her— and as they must at any time have been compared by her, had it—oh! had it, by any blessed felicity, occurred to her, to institute the comparison.—She saw that there never had been a time when she did not consider Mr.Knightley as infinitely the superior, or when his regard for her had not been infinitely the most dear. She saw, that in persuading herself, in fancying, in acting to the contrary, she had been entirely under a delusion, totally ignorant of her own heart—and, in short, that she had never really cared for Frank Churchill at all!"

(Source: knightley-emma, via janeaustendaily)